Random House

By Phil Town
In stock
1,62400
Phil Town is now a very wealthy man, but he wasn't always. In fact, he was living on a salary of $4000 a year when some well-timed advice launched him down a highway of investing self-education that revealed what the true "rules" are and how to make them work in one's favor. Chief among them, of course, is "rule #1": "don't lose money." Other rules are: don't diversify...think like an owner, not an investor ... never, ever be seduced into thinking the market is efficient. Town also believes strongly in "betting on the jockey," putting your faith in managers who've proven their financial mettle. Not only does Town reveal fresh methods for identifying who the truly reliable managers are, but he shows you how to test whether they really have faith in the businesses they're running.By far, the most controversial of the audiobook's assertions will be that giant 401(k) type mutual funds can't help but regress to the mean, and in the next twenty years, the mean could be very disappointing indeed. There's a very real chance that a 401(k) investor could see his holdings not grow at all in the next few decades. Fortunately, Town's stockpicking techniques are meant to walk investing phobes through the do-it-yourself process, equipping them with the tools they need to make quantum leaps toward financial security. About the Author He isn’t your typical Wall Street guy. An ex-Green Beret and former river guide, Phil Town is a self-made millionaire several times over and America’s most widely sought-after speaker on investing. In his new book, RULE #1, he describes the Rule #1 personal financial strategy in detail so that anyone, even first-time investors,can get–and stay–rich.Phil Town is the classic Everyman, albeit one whose education and resources were more limited than most. An average high school student, he completed college on his fourth try. Of his early working years, he says he “mostly got dirty for a living,” taking on jobs such as
AuthorPhil Town BindingPaperback
9780553712438
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By Bill O'Reilly
In stock
1,74000 1,60000
An irreverent, straight-talking look at American politics and culture from the iconoclastic anchor of one of the highest-rated TV news programs in the country. Bill O'Reilly has the hottest cable news program on the air. "The O'Reilly Factor," seen nightly on the Fox News Channel, boosted its ratings by more than six times in 1998, and has kept soaring. His blunt, ironic, no-holds-barred style has earned O'Reilly a devoted audience of viewers--friends and foes alike--who send him five thousand letters every week. Now, with the wit and intelligence that have made him one of the most talked-about stars in television, Bill O'Reilly identifies what's right, what's wrong, and what's absurd in the political, social, economic, and cultural life of America: *The media: why what you see is decided upon by morons *Politics: why most politicians are obsolete *Sex: why Americans would declare war on Denmark if they knew what was going on there As the nation prepares for another presidential race, O'Reilly's provocative opinions are sure to add fire to the ongoing debates. THE O'REILLY FACTOR is poised to follow in the footsteps of bestsellers such as Rush Limbaugh's  The Way Things Ought to Be  and Jesse Ventura's I Ain't Got Time to Bleed.
AuthorBill O'Reilly BindingAudio CD
9780812980042
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By Robert J. Samuelson
In stock
1,03375
The Great Inflation in the 1960s and 1970s, notes award-winning columnist Robert J. Samuelson, played a crucial role in transforming American politics, economy, and everyday life. The direct consequences included stagnation in living standards, a growing belief—both in America and abroad—that the great-power status of the United States was ending, and Ronald Reagan’s election to the presidency in 1980. But that is only half the story. The end of high inflation led to two decades of almost uninterrupted economic growth, rising stock prices and ever-increasing home values. Paradoxically, this prolonged prosperity triggered the economic and financial collapse of 2008 and 2009 by making Americans—from bank executives to ordinary homeowners—overconfident, complacent, and careless.  The Great Inflation and its Aftermath , Samuelson contends, demonstrated that we have not yet escaped the boom-and-bust cycles common in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. This is a sobering tale essential for anyone who wants to understand today’s world.
Author Robert J. Samuelson BindingPaperback
A MAN FOR ALL MARKETS
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By Edward O. Thorp
Out of stock
2,48100 2,07991
Before the advent of writing and books, human knowledge was memorized and transmitted down the generations by storytellers; but when this skill wasn’t necessary it declined. Similarly, in our time with the ubiquity of computers and hand calculators, the ability to carry out mental calculations has largely disappeared. Yet a person who knows just grammar school arithmetic can learn to do mental calculations comfortably and habitually. This skill, especially to make rapid approximate calculations, remains valuable, particularly for assessing the quantitative statements that one continually encounters. For instance, listening to the business news on the way to my office one morning, I heard the reporter say, “The Dow Jones Industrial Average [DJIA] is down 9 points to 11,075 on fears of a further interest rate rise to quell an overheated economy.” I mentally estimated a typical (one standard deviation ) DJIA change from the previous close, by an hour after the open, at about 0.6 percent or about sixty-six points. The probability of the reported move of “at least” nine points, or less than a seventh of this, was about 90 percent, so the market action was, contrary to the report, very quiet and hardly indicative of any fearful response to the news. There was nothing to worry about. Simple math allowed me to separate hype from reality.
AuthorEdward O. Thorp BindingHardcover
HOW TO KNOW GOD (4 CDS)
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By Deepak Chopra
In stock
1,71100 1,36800
The bestselling author Deepak Chopra is back with a new work that explores the seven ways we experience God.  As Chopra explains, these experiences are shaped not by any one religion but by an instinct that is hard-wired into the brain.  In this remarkable work, Chopra takes us step by step, from the first stage, where the brain's "fight or flight" response yields us the experience of a God who is an all-powerful parent, to the seventh stage, where the brain experiences God as pure being, a sacred presence that just is.  All seven stages are available to us at all times. In  How to Know God , Chopra charts a fascinating course for us, as we explore mysticism, religious ecstasy, genius, telepathy, multiple personality, and clairvoyance, drawing insights from psychology, neurology and physics as well as from the great religions.
AuthorDeepak Chopra BindingAudio CD
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By Clark Winter
In stock
2,15020 74430
A REVOLUTIONARY AND DISARMINGLY SIMPLE ROAD MAP FOR INVESTORS IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY People today are inundated with advice, opinions, and information about how to invest. The more data you accumulate, the thinking goes, the better decisions you’ll make. In  The Either/Or   Investor , global investment strategist Clark Winter shows that the opposite is the case, introducing a revelatory way of thinking about the markets based on finding and assessing just enough of the right information and using your common sense. According to Winter, investing comes down to making choices. All great investors employ an “either/or” filter for evaluating and simplifying the many investment opportunities available to them.  The Either/Or Investor  reveals how you can emulate this thought process while remaining realistic about your own goals and needs and gives you the tools to choose among the options that modern investors face, such as: • fear versus greed: In an anxious post-9/11 world, discover when it’s smart to make an aggressive financial move. • developed world versus developing world: Find out if you should stick with opportunities in the United States or risk those available in the emerging economies of China, Russia, India, Mexico, and Turkey. • anti-immigration versus migration of talent: Learn to evaluate the products that immigrants introduce to the rest of the world in order to assess the value in investing in American companies that cater to new immigrant groups. • too much information versus too little information: Use the Internet, newspapers, and TV to your advantage. (For example, get the pros and cons about China’s growing economic power so you can become informed enough to act.) • rising interest rates versus falling interest rates: Understand how changing interest rates are a good barometer for how to spend your money. Winter shows how anyone can learn to make sound decisions in a changing world by discerning trends early in an investment cycle, and then taking advantage of these trends or steering clear. Winter also explains how to choose a money manager and how to determine what the next investment opportunities might be. Armed with Winter’s methods, any investor can improve his or her own investment prowess.  The Either/Or Investor  is a way–both judicious and daring–for choosing a better future.
AuthorClark Winter BindingHardcover