Princeton University Press

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By Dewatripont Mathias
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2,55300 2,04240
The financial crisis that began in 2007 in the United States swept the world, producing substantial bank failures and forcing unprecedented state aid for the crippled global financial system. Bringing together three leading financial economists to provide an international perspective, Balancing the Banks draws critical lessons from the causes of the crisis and proposes important regulatory reforms, including sound guidelines for the ways in which distressed banks might be dealt with in the future. While some recent policy moves go in the right direction, others, the book argues, are not sufficient to prevent another crisis. The authors show the necessity of an adaptive prudential regulatory system that can better address financial innovation. Stressing the numerous and complex challenges faced by politicians, finance professionals, and regulators, and calling for reinforced international coordination (for example, in the treatment of distressed banks), the authors put forth a number of principles to deal with issues regarding the economic incentives of financial institutions, the impact of economic shocks, and the role of political constraints. Offering a global perspective, Balancing the Banks should be read by anyone concerned with solving the current crisis and preventing another such calamity in the future. Mathias Dewatripont is professor of economics at the Université Libre de Bruxelles (ECARES and Solvay Brussels School of Economics and Management), annual visiting professor of economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and research director of the Center for Economic Policy and Research. Jean-Charles Rochet is professor of mathematics and economics at the University of Toulouse I. Jean Tirole, the winner of the 2014 Nobel Prize in Economics, is chairman of the Foundation Jean-Jacques Laffont at the Toulouse School of Economics, scientific director of Toulouse's Industrial Economics Institute, and annual visiting professor of economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. More about this book Jean Tirole, Winner of the 2014 Nobel Prize in Economics
AuthorDewatripont Mathias BindingHardcover
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By Turner Adair
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2,54875 2,03900
Adair Turner became chairman of Britain's Financial Services Authority just as the global financial crisis struck in 2008, and he played a leading role in redesigning global financial regulation. In this eye-opening book, he sets the record straight about what really caused the crisis. It didn’t happen because banks are too big to fail—our addiction to private debt is to blame. Between Debt and the Devil challenges the belief that we need credit growth to fuel economic growth, and that rising debt is okay as long as inflation remains low. In fact, most credit is not needed for economic growth—but it drives real estate booms and busts and leads to financial crisis and depression. Turner explains why public policy needs to manage the growth and allocation of credit creation, and why debt needs to be taxed as a form of economic pollution. Banks need far more capital, real estate lending must be restricted, and we need to tackle inequality and mitigate the relentless rise of real estate prices. Turner also debunks the big myth about fiat money—the erroneous notion that printing money will lead to harmful inflation. To escape the mess created by past policy errors, we sometimes need to monetize government debt and finance fiscal deficits with central-bank money. Between Debt and the Devil shows why we need to reject the assumptions that private credit is essential to growth and fiat money is inevitably dangerous. Each has its advantages, and each creates risks that public policy must consciously balance. Adair Turner is chairman of the Institute for New Economic Thinking and the author of Economics after the Crisis. He lives in London. More about this book One of Financial Times (FT.com) Best Economics Books of 2015, chosen by Martin Wolf One of the Strategy+Business Best Business Books 2016 in Economy One of The Independent’s Best Economics Books 2015 One of Bloomberg Businessweek’s Best Books of 2015, chosen by Vítor Constâncio
AuthorTurner Adair BindingHardcover
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By Arvind Narayanan
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3,74200 3,25000
Arvind Narayanan is assistant professor of computer science at Princeton University. Joseph Bonneau is a postdoctoral researcher at the Applied Cryptography Group at Stanford University. Edward Felten is director of Princeton's Center for Information Technology Policy. Andrew Miller is a PhD student in computer science at the University of Maryland. Steven Goldfeder is a PhD student in computer science at Princeton.
AuthorArvind Narayanan Author 2Edward Felten
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By Princeton Review
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1,39900 97930
Cracking the GMAT, 2018 Edition, provides students with a thorough review of all tested GMAT topics, including data sufficiency, arithmetic, algebra, geometry, sentence correction, reading comprehension and critical reasoning. It also includes step-by-step instructions for the Integrated Reasoning question types (table analysis, graphics interpretation, multi-source reasoning and two-part analysis), plus tons of sample problems and drills.
AuthorPrinceton Review BindingPaperback
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By Princeton Review
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1,39900 97900
Cracking the GRE Premium Edition, 2018, provides students with a thorough review of all GRE topics; practice questions with detailed answer explanations; key strategies for solving Text Completions, Sentence Equivalents, Numeric Entry and Quantitative Comparisons and much more. Purchase of the Premium Edition also includes access to additional practice tests and extra test strategies, review and practice through our Premium Portal online.
AuthorPrinceton Review BindingPaperback
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By Rogoff Kenneth S
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2,54875
From the New York Times bestselling author of This Time Is Different, "a fascinating and important book" (Ben Bernanke) about phasing out most paper money to fight crime and tax evasion—and to battle financial crises by tapping the power of negative interest rates The world is drowning in cash—and it's making us poorer and less safe. In The Curse of Cash, Kenneth Rogoff, one of the world’s leading economists, makes a persuasive and fascinating case for an idea that until recently would have seemed outlandish: getting rid of most paper money. Even as people in advanced economies are using less paper money, there is more cash in circulation—a record $1.4 trillion in U.S. dollars alone, or $4,200 for every American, mostly in $100 bills. And the United States is hardly exceptional. So what is all that cash being used for? The answer is simple: a large part is feeding tax evasion, corruption, terrorism, the drug trade, human trafficking, and the rest of a massive global underground economy.
AuthorRogoff Kenneth S BindingHardcover
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By Shiller Robert J
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1,69775 1,35820
The reputation of the financial industry could hardly be worse than it is today in the painful aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis. New York Times best-selling economist Robert Shiller is no apologist for the sins of finance--he is probably the only person to have predicted both the stock market bubble of 2000 and the real estate bubble that led up to the subprime mortgage meltdown. But in this important and timely book, Shiller argues that, rather than condemning finance, we need to reclaim it for the common good. He makes a powerful case for recognizing that finance, far from being a parasite on society, is one of the most powerful tools we have for solving our common problems and increasing the general well-being. We need more financial innovation--not less--and finance should play a larger role in helping society achieve its goals. Challenging the public and its leaders to rethink finance and its role in society, Shiller argues that finance should be defined not merely as the manipulation of money or the management of risk but as the stewardship of society's assets. He explains how people in financial careers--from CEO, investment manager, and banker to insurer, lawyer, and regulator--can and do manage, protect, and increase these assets. He describes how finance has historically contributed to the good of society through inventions such as insurance, mortgages, savings accounts, and pensions, and argues that we need to envision new ways to rechannel financial creativity to benefit society as a whole. Ultimately, Shiller shows how society can once again harness the power of finance for the greater good. Robert J. Shiller is the author of Irrational Exuberance and The Subprime Solution, and the coauthor, with George A. Akerlof, of Animal Spirits: How Human Psychology Drives the Economy, and Why It Matters for Global Capitalism (all Princeton). He is the Arthur M. Okun Professor of Economics at Yale University. More about this book Robert J. Shiller, Co-Winner of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Economics Winner of the 2012 PROSE Award in Business, Finance & Management, Association of American Publishers Winner of the 2012 Business Book Award in Finance & Economics, 800-CEO-READ One of Choice's Outstanding Academic Titles for 2012 Winner of the 2013 Bronze Medal Book Award in Economics, Axiom Business Shortlisted for the 2012 Best Finance Books in China, Caijing Magazine
AuthorShiller Robert J BindingPaperback
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By Jonathan Morduch,Rachel Schneider
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2,17730 1,70000
What the financial diaries of working-class families reveal about economic stresses, why they happen, and what policies might reduce them Deep within the American Dream lies the belief that hard work and steady saving will ensure a comfortable retirement and a better life for one's children. But in a nation experiencing unprecedented prosperity, even for many families who seem to be doing everything right, this ideal is still out of reach. In The Financial Diaries, Jonathan Morduch and Rachel Schneider draw on the groundbreaking U.S. Financial Diaries, which follow the lives of 235 low- and middle-income families as they navigate through a year. Through the Diaries, Morduch and Schneider challenge popular assumptions about how Americans earn, spend, borrow, and save--and they identify the true causes of distress and inequality for many working Americans. We meet real people, ranging from a casino dealer to a street vendor to a tax preparer, who open up their lives and illustrate a world of financial uncertainty in which even limited financial success requires imaginative--and often costly--coping strategies. Morduch and Schneider detail what families are doing to help themselves and describe new policies and technologies that will improve stability for those who need it most. Combining hard facts with personal stories, The Financial Diaries presents an unparalleled inside look at the economic stresses of today's families and offers powerful, fresh ideas for solving them.
AuthorJonathan Morduch,Rachel Schneider Author 2Rachel Schneider
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By Akerlof George A
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1,44245
Phishing for Phools, Nobel Prize–winning economists George Akerlof and Robert Shiller deliver a fundamental challenge to this insight, arguing that markets harm as well as help us. As long as there is profit to be made, sellers will systematically exploit our psychological weaknesses and our ignorance through manipulation and deception. Rather than being essentially benign and always creating the greater good, markets are inherently filled with tricks and traps and will "phish" us as "phools." Phishing for Phools therefore strikes a radically new direction in economics, based on the intuitive idea that markets both give and take away. Akerlof and Shiller bring this idea to life through dozens of stories that show how phishing affects everyone, in almost every walk of life. We spend our money up to the limit, and then worry about how to pay the next month's bills. The financial system soars, then crashes. We are attracted, more than we know, by advertising. Our political system is distorted by money. We pay too much for gym memberships, cars, houses, and credit cards. Drug companies ingeniously market pharmaceuticals that do us little good, and sometimes are downright dangerous. Phishing for Phools explores the central role of manipulation and deception in fascinating detail in each of these areas and many more. It thereby explains a paradox: why, at a time when we are better off than ever before in history, all too many of us are leading lives of quiet desperation. At the same time, the book tells stories of individuals who have stood against economic trickery—and how it can be reduced through greater knowledge, reform, and regulation. George A. Akerlof is University Professor at Georgetown University and the winner of the 2001 Nobel Prize. Robert J. Shiller is Sterling Professor of Economics at Yale University, the winner of the 2013 Nobel Prize in economics, and the author of the New York Times bestseller Irrational Exuberance (Princeton). Akerlof and Shiller are also the authors of Animal Spirits: How Human Psychology Drives the Economy, and Why It Matters for Global Capitalism (Princeton). More about this book George A. Akerlof, Co-Winner of the 2001 Nobel Prize in Economics Robert J. Shiller, Co-Winner of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Economics Winner of the 2016 Gold Medal in Economics, Axiom Business Book Awards One of The Times Literary Supplement’s Books of the Year 2016, chosen by Paul Collier One of Foreign Affairs’ Best Economic, Social, and Environmental (Economics) Books of 2016 Selected for Bloomberg View’s “The Writing that Shaped Economic Thinking in 2016” Honorable Mention for the 2016 PROSE Award in Economics, Association of American Publishers One of The Independent’s Best Economics Books 2015 One of LinkedIn’s Best Business Books of 2015 One of BusinessInsider.com’s Best Business Books of 2015 One of Legal Theory Bookworm’s Books of the Year 2015 Longlisted for the Financial Times and McKinsey Business Book of the Year 2015
AuthorAkerlof George A BindingPaperback
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By George A. Akerlof, Robert J. Shiller
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1,49900 1,19900
"Akerlof and Shiller extend the standard ‘market failure' theory--which says that there is a potential role for government intervention when markets fail--by showing that markets fail not only because of the familiar reasons of externalities and unfair income distribution, but also because of the pervasive phenomenon of ‘phishing for phools' (profit-seeking through manipulation and deception). They point the way to a new paradigm freed from the constraints of market failure theory, able to illuminate ‘control by capital' (partly through phishing) and to prescribe for ‘control of capital' (partly by techniques for limiting phishing suggested here)."--Robert H. Wade, London School of Economics "This insightful book exposes a fundamental contradiction in the market system. Consumers and policymakers beware: profit-seeking businesses foster efficiency and innovation, but have strong incentives to manipulate you and sophisticated new data tools allow them to do so in personalized ways."--Laura D'Andrea Tyson, University of California, Berkeley "This fun but serious book tells how the standard story about free markets often gets it wrong. Indeed, Akerlof and Shiller suggest that we should drop the view of markets as generally benign institutions. The argument is laid out with the help of fascinating anecdotes, the language is conversational, and the book is easy to read. It is addressed to a broad audience, but economists will enjoy it too.
AuthorGeorge A. Akerlof, Robert J. Shiller Author 2Robert J. Shiller
POWER AND PLENTY
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By Ronald Findlay,Kevin O′rourke
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4,25075 3,95715
International trade has shaped the modern world, yet until now no single book has been available for both economists and general readers that traces the history of the international economy from its earliest beginnings to the present day. Power and Plenty fills this gap, providing the first full account of world trade and development over the course of the last millennium. Ronald Findlay and Kevin O'Rourke examine the successive waves of globalization and "deglobalization" that have occurred during the past thousand years, looking closely at the technological and political causes behind these long-term trends. They show how the expansion and contraction of the world economy has been directly tied to the two-way interplay of trade and geopolitics, and how war and peace have been critical determinants of international trade over the very long run. The story they tell is sweeping in scope, one that links the emergence of the Western economies with economic and political developments throughout Eurasia centuries ago. Drawing extensively upon empirical evidence and informing their systematic analysis with insights from contemporary economic theory, Findlay and O'Rourke demonstrate the close interrelationships of trade and warfare, the mutual interdependence of the world's different regions, and the crucial role these factors have played in explaining modern economic growth. Power and Plenty is a must-read for anyone seeking to understand the origins of today's international economy, the forces that continue to shape it, and the economic and political challenges confronting policymakers in the twenty-first century. First published in 2007. Ronald Findlay is the Ragnar Nurkse Professor of Economics at Columbia University. He is the author of Factor Proportions, Trade, and Growthand Trade, Development, and Political Economy. Kevin H. O'Rourke is professor of economics at Trinity College, Dublin. He is the coauthor of Globalization and History.
AuthorRonald Findlay,Kevin O′rourke BindingPaperback
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By French Kenneth R
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1,69775 1,36160
In the fall of 2008, fifteen of the world's leading economists--representing the broadest spectrum of economic opinion--gathered at New Hampshire's Squam Lake. Their goal: the mapping of a long-term plan for financial regulation reform. The Squam Lake Report distills the wealth of insights from the ongoing collaboration that began at these meetings and provides a revelatory, unified, and coherent voice for fixing our troubled and damaged financial markets. As an alternative to the patchwork solutions and ideologically charged proposals that have dominated other discussions, the Squam Lake group sets forth a clear nonpartisan plan of action to transform the regulation of financial markets--not just for the current climate--but for generations to come. Arguing that there has been a conflict between financial institutions and society, these diverse experts present sound and transparent prescriptions to reduce this divide. They look at the critical holes in the existing regulatory framework for handling complex financial institutions, retirement savings, and credit default swaps. They offer ideas for new financial instruments designed to recapitalize banks without burdening taxpayers. To lower the risk that large banks will fail, the authors call for higher capital requirements as well as a systemic regulator who is part of the central bank. They collectively analyze where the financial system has failed, and how these weak points should be overhauled. Combining an immense depth of academic, private sector, and public policy experience, The Squam Lake Report contains urgent recommendations that will positively influence everyone's financial well-being--all who care about the world's economic health need to pay attention. Kenneth R. French is the Carl E. and Catherine M. Heidt Professor of Finance at Dartmouth College. Martin N. Baily is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. John Y. Campbell is the Morton L. and Carole S. Olshan Professor of Economics at Harvard University. John H. Cochrane is the AQR Capital Management Professor of Finance at the University of Chicago. Douglas W. Diamond is the Merton H. Miller Distinguished Service Professor of Finance at the University of Chicago. Darrell Duffie is the Dean Witter Distinguished Professor of Finance at Stanford University. Anil K Kashyap is the Edward Eagle Brown Professor of Economics and Finance at the University of Chicago. Frederic S. Mishkin is the Alfred Lerner Professor of Banking and Financial Institutions at Columbia University. Raghuram G. Rajan is the Eric J. Gleacher Distinguished Service Professor of Finance at the University of Chicago. David S. Scharfstein is the Edmund Cogswell Converse Professor of Finance and Banking at Harvard University. Robert J. Shiller is the Arthur M. Okun Professor of Economics at Yale University. Hyun Song Shin is the Hughes-Rogers Professor of Economics at Princeton University. Matthew J. Slaughter is the Signal Companies Professor of Management at Dartmouth College. Jeremy C. Stein is the Moise Y. Safra Professor of Economics at Harvard University. René M. Stulz is the Everett D. Reese Chair of Banking and Monetary Economics at Ohio State University.
AuthorFrench Kenneth R BindingHardback
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